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Attacks of Opportunity

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 6 months ago

Does (insert action) provoke an Attack of Opportunity?

The rules on which actions provoke Attacks of Opportunity are:

 

  • If it is a standard action or full-round action; and
  • It is not an attack action; and
  • It does not specifically have a note that it does not provoke (such as Aid Another, or using Concentration to defensively cast a spell)

 

Then an action provokes attacks of opportunity. If it fails any of these tests (e.g. it is a move or free action, or an attack action, or you are aiding another) then it does not provoke.


 

Making Multiple Attacks of Opportunity Against a Single Target

Q: If an enemy takes a single action that provokes two or more attacks of opportunity from the same target for multiple reasons could the target take all of those attacks or is he limited to one per action?

 

If you have the ability to make multiple Attacks of Opportunity against the same opponent within the same round (i.e. you have Combat Reflexes 7) then you get one Attack of Opportunity per provoking opportunity.


 

Deliberately Provoking Attacks of Opportunity

Q: Can someone purposefully not mind their defense to 'goad' Attacks of Opportunity out of their enemies while moving before they have used their safe squares? This question is more to get the feel that a lot of members have about this, but an official answer would be cool too.

 

I suspect this is something that GMs will have strong opinions about. I'd want to do some playtesting before making an official ruling, but my initial reaction is that if a player asked about it in my game, I'd rule that they could, but that they could only do so by slowing their maximum movement down.

 

My thinking here is that if your speed is 40 ft, and you move that full speed, you're just too fast for people to react too, in the first 10 feet. The limit isn't you: it's them. Their reaction time. But if you only moved a total of 30 ft in the round, I can see you doing it "slowly" so that they could start attacking with your second square of movement. And if you moved only 15 ft., then you could be attacked for every square you moved.

 

This would only apply if you wanted it to happen, of course. I'm not suggesting that a character who chooses to move less than their full speed should attract additional Attacks of Opportunity in all cases. I'd assume that normally they were covering that distance as fast as they could.


 

When have you 'used' an Attack of Opportunity?

You have only made an Attack of Opportunity when you make the attack roll to try and damage your opponent. You do not 'use up' one of your Attacks of Opportunity for simply making a Base Attack Check (for instance, against an opponent using the Tumble skill).


 

Attacks of Opportunity for Movement

Q: When calculating whether movement has provoked an Attack of Opportunity, should we count the actual squares the character passes through, or the number of squares of movement used?

 

Count the number of squares of movement used up. For example, a human with 30' speed provokes when he moves into a difficult terrain square which is threatened by an opponent (as he spent 2 squares of movement moving into it).


 

Attacks of Opportunity and Two Weapon Fighting

You can choose to use your off hand weapon for an attack of opportunity if you wish. An example of when you might choose to do this if you had a slashing weapon in your off hand and a bludgeoning weapon in your primary hand and the attack of opportunity was against a zombie.

 

In your turn after making the off hand attack of opportunity, you suffer full TWF penalties, even if you only attack with your primary hand weapon.

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